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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i want to add one thing here. it doesn't matter if he goes to every city in the country and spends his entire state of the union talking about spending on infrastructure and things of that nature, but the republican-led house is not going to go along with that. this is really an act in futility. >> dwoent know how. to be honest, we don't know how much of the speech is going to push for infrastructure spending. god forbid we have better infrastructure spending. the economic piece is difficult for the president given the recovery has been really slow. we have the numbers from january. long-term unemployment has held steady. that is a lot of people who have been out of work for six months or more, and it is at its lowest rate since june 2009. that's a long-term number. the short-term and sort of standard unemployment numbers haven't budged considerably, and so the president does -- is in a tricky position in terms of highlighting an economic plan that legislatively may go nowhere, and if you talk about what he has done so far, there's a sense of perhaps malaise among the american publ
of it for the people that want it. forget about getting people that are outside of it. in new york city with neighborhoods with a lot of money, there are people on waiting lists. >> for, like -- for people who are wealthy. >> as to the argument that it fades as the kids -- you have a couple of quality pre-k education with full day kindergarten. full day kindergarten is enormously important. some of those things the state could pick up. when i became governor that was my frontal boundary one and you put one-third of the billion dollars into pre-k and full day, and by the team i left in my eighth year pennsylvania kids finished first in the nation on the nate test in eighth grade with readers wrshgz eighth grade. we started out in year one, and our eighth graders that went through pre-k and full day kindergarten, and for us with all of the english as second language cities that we have for us to be number one in reading was extraordinary, and it came from an investment. that investment has to go all wait through, and you're right, quality of teachers. we had a program called keystone star
new york state or new york city, rather, have those kind of programs that basically take the millionaires out of giving directly to candidates, and that reduces corruption. they may be able to spend on their own voice, maybe their movies, make their ads, but if we don't have people flying on planes together and feeling that they owe someone hundreds of thousands of dollars for bundling, there's a lot less of that second door, the corruption door, and i think that's where the tangible action can be. >> larry, we -- there are -- there's a littany of scandal that has rocked washington, specifically relating to donors and money. charlie rangel, tom delay, jack abramhoff, jesse jackson, most recently. do you sense, as you do your work, that politicians ever -- there is ever a sense of remorse here or is it more i've got to be less -- i've got to be more crafty in how i do this going into my campaign? >> i think there's a sense of remorse when he got caught, but i think that -- to be fair i think they're put under tremendous pressure that to run a race right now, to run a senat
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)